Orphan Sunday 2010

Is it appropriate to wish you a ‘Happy’ Orphan Sunday?  I actually think it is kind of a happy occasion.  While we are taking on the challenging task of bringing attention to the world’s orphan crisis, you’ll also see families at the forefront who were created through tragedy, true beauty from the ashes.  You’ll also see beautiful, happy moments where people come together for a common goal…to protect the fatherless.

We’ve been keeping this under wraps until we were done working on it, but I’m excited about the finished project.  In honor of National Adoption Month, our state’s paper came last week to follow FPD and I around to get a feel for what it was like to be parents of seven, adopted, African-American children.  The article will be finished next week and will include pics and video (for the paper’s website) of us doing all the regular things we do.  They watched me make the pick up from the kid’s school, they watched us struggle through Giggles’ homework (and not struggle at all with ShyGuy), they watched FPD make dinner, and they watched us all pray over it and then devour it.  Typical FP Family stuff.  I’m hoping it will make people think about how many older, special needs children there are out there who need families still.    And, I got to cross an item off my bucket list.  I got to wear one of those television mics.  I was so over it after day one.  With seven kids, my entourage is large enough.  If Bravo comes knocking, we won’t be answering.  Sorry.  But, we love the reporter that did this story, he’s called me five or six times to fact check and make sure he’s highlighting the issues in a respectful way.  He’s trying to tackle a potentially sensitive subject with grace and dignity, all while protecting our children’s privacy.  I will post a link to the article when it’s finished.

In the meantime, you can stroll down memory lane with an article that was published in our city’s multicultural paper when we brought GigantoBaby home (when we only had three children. Ahhh… the days of normal amounts of sleep).

I also want to make sure I draw attention to all the people who are advocating and fundraising for the orphans that have touched their hearts and need to come home.  Don’t forget to peek at my sidebar on the right!  As I get more and more into my volunteer work in China, the number of children that China is working to find families for seems to grow and grow.  Right now, there are 1,985 older or special needs children on China’s Shared List.  Some of these children have been waiting for families for YEARS.  Some have grants for their adoptions.  If you’re looking to adopt, it’s a great option.  China has a very streamlined system for adoptions and REALLY advocates for their older and special needs children.  The more I learn, the more impressed I become.
If adoption isn’t in your future right now, but you’re looking to help children whose families need your support to be able to stay together, then the former children of Luckyhill can always use a scholarship contribution to enable them to continue to NOT attend Kings International School.  While I don’t collect money directly, you can contact me to get information on the reputable NGO that is helping them.  It’s a good way to stay connected to the kids we all know and love in Ghana.  For those of you with children from Luckyhill, do you have a child over there that you remember and love?  I can give you info on how to help send them to school.  
There are so many ways to touch one of these kid’s lives.  Now is the time.
–FullPlateMom,
who *hearts* Orphan Sunday.  

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