Ally, FPM

Less About the Louvre, and more about the Hair.

Today was our day to visit the Louvre. I hear this is what most people go to Paris for. Well, not us, I guess.

We started our morning thrift shopping in the Le Marais. The hotel Concierge, who is always slightly appalled by the questions I ask her, was more than slightly appalled when I asked her about where to buy the best used clothing. “You want USED clothes?” “Yes, we really of do.”

We got this for Brady, for USD $5.59, and he was quite impressed.

We got a lot more than that. We bought our clothes by the kilogram. For real. After checking out though, it began to rain. So, we ate an ice cream and waited for the rain to slow. This ice cream was special. I had eaten the same flavor, out of the same type of cone, from the same shop, when I was 16 years old and went to Paris on my high school trip. Ally found that amusing. “That makes this flavor really old.” Hush your mouth, and hope this rain stops soon, young lady. We need to go!

It stopped and we rushed back to the hotel to drop off our kilos of clothes and head off for our “preferred access tickets” for the Louvre.

Y’all, that place is nuts.

That’s the line to see Mona Lisa. No.thank.you. I have seen her and Ally has ZERO interest in her. So, off we went to see some other cool stuff. Alas, we are not art aficionados. So, what we classified as “cool stuff” amounted to us being like “HEY! WE FOUND CATE!”

Yes, that is a statue of a naked child wrestling a…goose? We laughed endlessly about how our Goose would TOTALLY do that, took a pic with it, and moved on.

There was other cool stuff, but I likely won’t remember a whole lot of it.

Because, other stuff was the coolest. Today, Ally was brave enough to sit in an African salon and have her hair braided. That might not sound brave, but when you are forced to leave your homeland at a young age, leaving everything you know behind, it is VERY hard to confront those memories again. Today, she did.

For those of you who follow me on Facebook, she was brave enough to take you along with her in a way she felt safe with. That is a huge honor. She wants to do that for other families who have younger children living through what she has lived through. Ally has been living with us, in the U.S., for ten years now. For ten years she has lived as a Ghanaian-American with forced (by me) cultural connections.

Today, I walked behind her, saying nothing, texting her dad, and praying she would take the lead. She did. In a small, but VERY large to me, gesture, she decided to navigate the process of having her hair done in a African salon.

She is so beautiful, inside and out.

–FullPlateMom, who is so lucky to be along for the ride.

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